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A spirit like a bird! (Genesis chap. 1, verse 2)

“And the Spirit of God was hovering over the waters.” The last part of the second verse is another absolute mystery. In the source text the Hebrew phrase has a meaning which escapes us almost completely when transtated into English: werùach Elohim merachèfet al-penè hammàyim. Is this the spirit of…

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The cry of the monster of Chaos (Genesis chap. 1, verse 2)

The second verse of the first chapter of Genesis begins with a very enigmatic word. It is usually translated as and the earth was formless and empty. We read in the Hebrew text: weha-haàrets haietà tòhu uavòhu (Genesis chap. 1, verse 2). The first word – wehaàrets – is translated…

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The Pregnant Woman’s Sufferings (Genesis chap. 3, verse 16)

Unto the woman he said, I will greatly multiply thy sorrow and thy conception; in sorrow thou shalt bring forth children; and thy desire shall be to thy husband, and he shall rule over thee. The woman will give birth between pains and sorrows. It means that, before the transgression, the…

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Abyss and darkness (Genesis chap. 1, verse 2)

The second sentence of the first chapter of the Bible is usually translated as: and darkness covered the abyss. There are two words that need to be explained, or better to say, they need to be imagined. The ancient Jews, in fact, didn’t use concepts or ideas to figure reality,…

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Heaven and earth (Genesis chap. 1, verse. 1)

The fourth and the fifth word of the Hebrew Bible – et hashamaìm weet haàrets – are generally translated in our Bibles with the words: heaven and earth. Whereas we have two different terms with two specific meanings, for Jews “heaven and earth” constituted a single phrase that means the…

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Elohim: God or gods? (Genesis chap. 1, verse 1)

The third word of the Hebrew Bible is Elohim: “Bereshìt barà Elohim …” “At the beginning God created … “. So, at the very beginning of the Hebrew Bible we find a reference to polytheism? The verb barà (created) is singular, so the author was convinced that there was only…

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