• it_IT

How to understand the Bible (First part)

For centuries the Bible is at the center of debate not only about its content and doctrines, but also around the way by which understand it. The Jews interpret literally their Bible – which roughly corresponds to our Old Testament –  so striving to settle all difficulties and contradictions through…

Continue reading

Did Enoch and Elijah ascend to heaven?

Some skeptics charge Jesus with missing out on Elijah being first to “ascend into heaven” but the solution is the same as it is today: The Hebrew word translated “heaven” in the first verse. shamiyim, simply means the sky, as “heavens” does metaphorically today. The “heavens” were also regarded as the…

Continue reading

Biglino is not right! Extra biblical evidences about the Tower of Babel don’t exist

Kunsthistorisches Museum – Vienna This article is the answer to what appears in the Biglino’s blog about the Tower of Babel. This article is excerpted from the book of Alessandro and Alessio De Angelis, Oltre la mente di Dio. The authors believe that the Bible copied the Tower of Babel’s story…

Continue reading

How to unterstand the Bible – Jesus Anointed by a Sinful Woman (Lk 7:36-50)

The Gospels don’t offer the slightest pretext to identify the sinful/adulterous woman with Mary Magdalene (for the Luke’s text click here). The identification of Mary Magdalene with the sinful woman was made Jacobus de Voragine in his Legenda Aurea. Luke (ch. 8:2) just says that Mary Magdalene was possessed by “seven evil spirits”, before…

Continue reading

How to understand the Bible (Fifth part)

The Bible’s books that don’t speak about history are the richest for our life. A striking case is represented by the three booklets called: Tobit, Judith and Esther. The allusions to a certain period of Israel’s history aren’t useful to identify the historical period when the booklets were written. For example, the story…

Continue reading

How to understand the Bible (Fourth part)

The Bible is full of mysterious animals that speak to men, often urging them to embark on a road rather than another, or acting as a voice of conscience. The historical-critical exegesis neglects these elements and treats them as mere pieces of the literary genre to which the accounts belong.…

Continue reading